Minnesota falls short on sports betting legalization

Minnesota falls short on sports betting legalization

Added:
Minnesota falls short on sports betting legalization

The attempts to legalize sports betting in Minnesota have failed for the sixth year running.

Since the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2018 ruling, states have been able to implement their own sports gambling regulations; however, Minnesota has had difficulty doing so. Members of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL) grew closer than ever this year, winning the support of horse racetracks, charities, sports teams, and Native American tribes. Regretfully, the bill failed to receive the necessary number of votes due to political maneuvering at the Capitol.

The principal sponsor, Rep. Zack Stephenson, is optimistic about 2025, citing  progress and a good agreement that brought major interests together. The proposed measure would have given tribes exclusive online sports betting rights while allocating tax money to a variety of objectives, including charitable gaming, horse racetracks, major sporting events, problem gambling programs, youth sports, and a tribal equalization fund.

Rep. Zack Stephenson commented on the sports betting shortcoming:

“We’re going to come up just short on the sports betting bill this year, but in the last few days, we proved that we could find a deal that all the major stakeholders could live with.”

Meanwhile, lawmakers passed Senate File 2219, which prohibits the use of historical horse racing (HHR) devices at racetracks. This decision disappointed track executives, who had thought that these devices would increase their earnings.

Randy Sampson, CEO of Canterbury Park said:

“We believe this proposal deserves a much closer look than it received from the legislators.”

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