Supreme Court leaves Florida sports betting compact intact

Supreme Court leaves Florida sports betting compact intact

Added:
Supreme Court leaves Florida sports betting compact intact

The Supreme Court decided on Monday that it will not consider West Flagler and Associates’ legal challenge to the compact between the Seminole Tribe of Florida and the state, meaning that the status quo on sports betting in Florida is safe for the time being.

The 30-year accord for exclusivity in retail and online betting will end in 2051. Now that the Supreme Court is out of the picture, legal expert Daniel Wallach has suggested three avenues for West Flagler to pursue their case challenge. West Flagler may file a new lawsuit in federal court arguing that the Equal Protection Clause is violated by the compact. Justice Brett Kavanaugh made this claim regarding the case. The organization could possibly bring a new federal lawsuit contesting the extent of the DOI’s involvement in executing the accord. Lastly, the organization has the option to file a constitutional challenge in state court in Florida.

The Seminole Tribe said in a statement:

“The Seminole Tribe of Florida applauds today’s decision by the U.S. Supreme Court to decline consideration of the case involving the Tribe’s Gaming Compact with the State of Florida. It means members of the Seminole Tribe and all Floridians can count on a bright future made possible by the Compact.”

The Florida compact, with its “hub and spoke” format of server location functioning as bet location, could serve as inspiration for other states with substantial tribal presences, such as California and Oklahoma, to model future sports betting markets.

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