UKGC asks for more evidence as consultation nears end

UKGC asks for more evidence as consultation nears end

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Posted by: AffPapa

The UKGC, or the UK Gambling Commission, has announced the last opportunity to supply evidence concerning the ways that it should modify the research methodologies it utilizes to measure the UK gambling participation.

The UKGC was looking for opinions and information from different stakeholders in the consultation, which was launched back on the 18th of December 2020, in regards to its approach to recording and obtaining data on problem gambling statistics and UK gambling participation. The Commission highlighted the necessity of acquiring such input and feedback as it is currently going over the 2005 Gambling Act, working closely with the UK government.

It is also hoping to give the government as accurate of data as possible on the gambling participation in the country as it reviews its methodologies. It is also seeking to figure out what pushes people into problem gambling.

The statement made by the UKGC enclosed:

The Commission is ambitious about improving the quality, robustness and timeliness of our statistics. We, therefore, set out a commitment in our 2020/21 Business Plan to review our approach to measuring participation and prevalence and publish conclusions.

Up until now, the UKGC has put together all of its data in conformity with the rules and guidelines that are published by the government’s ‘Statistical Service in the Code of Practice for Statistics’. The specific committees of Lord Grade and Lord Foster stated that it was absolutely necessary for the UKGC to provide ‘reliable facts’ on the statistics of problem gambling in the review of the Gambling Act.

The UKGC, aside from going over its research methodologies, has also initiated open consultations regarding gambling affordability measures, operators customer support obligations and controls and secure gambling interactions.

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